8 Easy Terrarium Plants for Open or Closed Glass

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8 Easy Terrarium Plants for Open or Closed Glass :- Plants are grown in clear glass terrariums, which can be closed or open. Due to the ability to more precisely monitor and manage the environment, including temperature and humidity, akin to that of a greenhouse, they are a popular alternative for growing houseplants.

 

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8 Easy Terrarium Plants for Open or Closed Glass

Closed terrariums, as the name implies, are completely enclosed glass containers, whereas open terrariums are primarily contained but include an open top or side wall. The air in a sealed terrarium without ventilation is recycled, and the artificially created humidity serves as a miniature ecosystem that, once formed, doesn’t need any more water.

Open terrariums, on the other hand, obtain fresh air, which keeps them from becoming too damp. While plants for open terrariums should be able to tolerate above-average humidity, those for closed terrariums should be humidity-loving and thrive in regularly moist conditions. When designing your terrarium, the most crucial thing to keep in mind is to make sure the plants you select have similar growing conditions, such as soil, light, humidity, and watering.

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Fittonia (nerve plant)

Fittonia, or the nerve plant, is a great plant for a closed terrarium. It blends well with numerous planting schemes and larger color-coordinated displays because to its colorful and patterned foliage that comes in a range of colors.

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The nerve plant is a low-light, compact, slow-growing plant that requires little maintenance. Because of this, it’s among the greatest plants for a closed terrarium.

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Asparagus fern, Asparagus setaceus

With its ability to flourish in damp conditions and its graceful, tree-like form that complements the tiny garden aesthetic of certain terrarium designs, asparagus setaceus possesses all the characteristics of a wonderful terrarium plant.

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Remember that cats and people can be somewhat poisoned by asparagus ferns. Not to mention that the plant’s leaves can turn brown if handled excessively and that its stems contain microscopic thorns that can irritate your skin.

 

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Moss

Moss, which requires indirect sunshine and continuous moisture, thrives best in a closed terrarium. Additionally, moss makes an excellent foil for other plants; wrap it around stones or cover compost with it.

You can use grass moss raked up from your garden, or you can purchase various types of moss from terrarium specialist providers, such as cushion moss and sheet moss.

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Peperomia

The vast Peperomia genus is ideal for beginning terrarium gardeners because almost every species of the genus thrives in wet environments with indirect light. Peperomias can be classified into three categories: those that trail, such as Peperomia ‘Pepperspot’ and Peperomia prostrater (string of turtles);

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those that have large leaves, such as Peperomia obtusfolia (Mini Rubber Plant) and Peperomia polybotrya (raindrop peperomia); and those that have foliage, such as Peperomia argyria (watermelon peperomia).

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Pilea

Since most Pilea plants prefer a warm, humid atmosphere over direct sunshine, they work well in enclosed terrariums. The friendship plant (Pilea peperomioides), baby tears (Pilea depressa), and artillery fern (Pilea microphylla) are just a few of the many species in this diverse genus.

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The moon valley Pilea (Pilea mollis), with its textured green leaves and burgundy veins, is a particularly noteworthy pilea to try in a terrarium. It’s a stunning statement plant. Silver glitter pileas and baby tears make great accent plants that contrast with the more colorful foliage in the arrangement while also adding a little texture. A larger variety of pilea, friendship plant thrives in larger terrariums.

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Creeping fig (Focus pumelo)

With its heart-shaped, fresh-green leaves, the lovely creeping fig will soon cover the ground in your terrarium before beginning to climb; you might even see it crawl up the edges of the glass.

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High humidity is ideal for creeping fig growth, and it does best in a closed terrarium as opposed to being cultivated as a typical houseplant. Although it can become lanky in low light, it requires more light than other terrarium plants and doesn’t require direct sunlight.

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Arrowhead vine (Synovium)

Arrowhead vines come in a multitude of varieties, each with unique leaf colors and shapes. They are ideal for a beginner’s terrarium since they require little maintenance and can flourish in extremely low light.

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Synovium, being vines, will eventually surpass their space, although they are easily trimmed back to size. Or look for Synonym ‘Pixie,’ a more compact, terrarium-friendly variety with green and cream-white leaves. Grow this moisture-loving plant alongside other moisture-loving plants like ferns.

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  • JASMINE GOMEZ

    Jasmine Gomez is the Wishes Editor at Birthday Stock, where she cover the best wishes, quotes across family, friends and more. When she's not writing for a living, she enjoys karaoke and dining out more than she cares to admit. Who we are and how we work. We currently have seven trained editors working in our office to produce top-notch content that you can rely on. All articles are published according to the four-eyes principle: After completion of the raw version, the texts are checked by (at least) one other editor for orthographic and content accuracy.

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