Plant a Gorgeous Gladiolus Flower Garden

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Plant a Gorgeous Gladiolus Flower Garden :- When it comes to the flowers that may be grown in your yard, glads are without a doubt among the easiest to cultivate. After planting the corms in the ground in the spring, you will need to return to the location ninety days later to pick the flowers.

 

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Plant a Gorgeous Gladiolus Flower Garden

Pinching and trimming are not necessary in this situation. There will be no staking or tying. No deadheading or fertilizing is allowed. Gladiolus do not require the attention of a gardener to be cared after.

They are resolute in their pursuit of blossoming and eager to get on with it for good! In the following paragraphs, you will find some suggestions that will assist you in getting the most out of these carefree summer bulbs.

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Plant Generously

Every gladiolus corm will provide you with a stalk that is between three and four feet tall and ten to twelve orchid-like blossoms. Gladiolus corms are surprisingly affordable. There is a wide selection of stunning kinds available to choose from, some of which have ruffles, while others have petals that display two or even three different colors.

 

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One of the most enjoyable things to do is to cultivate a rainbow of varied colors, ranging from bright oranges and wine-reds to romantic pinks and lavenders. You should not be afraid to try because the cost is inexpensive and planting is a breeze.

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Get Creative with Planting Locations

glads have shallow roots, and the foliage of glads, which resembles a sword, shoots upward rather than outward. This indicates that a large number of blossoms can be crammed into a very limited amount of space.

The corms should be planted in a grid, with a distance of five inches between each one (center to center) and a depth of four inches, if you are growing them in a raised bed or a conventional garden bed. In a garden bed that is 2 feet by 4 feet, you should be able to accommodate approximately fifty corms.

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It is recommended to grow the corms in groups of seven or more in a flower garden. Planting in containers is still another alternative. Additionally, you should think about growing some corms in nursery pots that are either two or three gallons in size.

It is possible to transplant these glads in order to fill up gaps in your flower beds once the middle of summer arrives.

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Plant in Batches

Gladiolus corms bloom approximately 90 days from planting. So, if you were to plant all your corms on the same day in mid-May, all your glads would bloom at about the same time in mid-August.

For a much longer season of blooms, you can divide the corms into 3 or 4 batches and plant them 2 weeks apart. Get the first batch into the ground right before the last frost date and plant the rest at 2-week intervals. This way you can be picking glads well into September.

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Provide Support If Needed

Not all glads require stakes, but doing so is the most effective method for maintaining the stems in a good and straight position. It is possible to use bamboo canes that are narrow to support individual stems. When you plant in a grid, you can use stakes and twine to tie the stems together and keep them in check.

Consider employing a flower farmer approach, which consists of suspending a grow-through grid of wire or poly netting between 12 and 18 inches above the ground, if you are cultivating a large number of glads.

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Know When to Pick

When the bottom two to three petals of the gladiolus stalk are open, the stalks are ready to be harvested. When picked earlier, the higher flowers could not reach their full maturity.

It is recommended that an additional incision be made in order to remove the very top two buds that are located on the stalk. Stems that have been cut should be placed directly into water and then moved to a cool spot.

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Grow as an Annual or Perennial

In zones 7-10, gladiolus corms are able to withstand the winter. When the weather is colder, you can dig the corms in the fall and then bring them inside to overwinter them. You also have the option of treating your glads as annuals and purchasing fresh corms every spring.

You should only take off as much of the stem as you require in order to overwinter the corms. This will allow you to leave plenty of foliage behind, which will assist the corm in regaining its energy for the next year.

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Don’t Be Afraid to Shorten the Stems

Some glads can be quite scary. When placed in a tall vase, the stems that are between three and four feet tall look lovely on their own; yet, it can be difficult to combine them with other cut flowers. Shortening the stems is the solution to the problem.

It is possible to turn this flower into an attractive shower of orchid-like blossoms by shortening the stem length by a few inches from the top and more from the bottom.

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  • JASMINE GOMEZ

    Jasmine Gomez is the Wishes Editor at Birthday Stock, where she cover the best wishes, quotes across family, friends and more. When she's not writing for a living, she enjoys karaoke and dining out more than she cares to admit. Who we are and how we work. We currently have seven trained editors working in our office to produce top-notch content that you can rely on. All articles are published according to the four-eyes principle: After completion of the raw version, the texts are checked by (at least) one other editor for orthographic and content accuracy.

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